Public Choice

, Volume 134, Issue 1–2, pp 31–46

Flatter world and thicker walls? Blogs, censorship and civic discourse in China

Article

Abstract

The Internet simply because it exists in China will not bring democracy to China. It is a tool, not a cause of political change. So far, the Chinese government has succeeded through censorship and regulation in blocking activists from using the Internet as an effective political tool. Likewise, blogs may be a catalyst for long-term political change because they are helping to enlarge the space for collaboration and conversation on subjects not directly related to political activism or regime change. However their role in China is more likely to involve political evolution—not revolution.

Keywords

China Internet Democracy Blogs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, BV 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Journalism & Media Studies CtrUniversity of Hong KongHong KongHong Kong

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