Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 85, Issue 1, pp 91–96 | Cite as

Confounding Psychosis in the Postpartum Period

  • Jack Castro
  • Stephen Billick
  • Anne Kleiman
  • Maria Chiechi
  • Mohamed Al-Rashdan
Original Paper

Abstract

This case report alerts the psychiatric clinician to consider nonpsychiatric etiologies of psychosis appearing during the postpartum period besides postpartum psychosis. The case includes a description of the patient’s psychiatric presentation, admission to the inpatient psychiatric unit with subsequent transfer to the medicine department including neuroimaging and neurological consultation. The patient had a remission of psychosis after only two and half days of antipsychotic medication administration. Positive findings on the MRI suggested a demyelinating disease and a 4-month follow up MRI continued to be positive. The etiology was presumed to be a demyelinating disease. In conclusion, psychiatrists need to be alert to include nonpsychiatric pathologies in the differential diagnosis when a patient presents with psychosis in the postpartum period.

Keywords

Psychosomatic medicine Psychiatric misdiagnosis Postpartum psychosis Multiple sclerosis Demyelinating diseases Psychosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Castro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephen Billick
    • 2
  • Anne Kleiman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria Chiechi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohamed Al-Rashdan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Metropolitan Hospital CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.New York Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.New YorkUSA

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