Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 82, Issue 1, pp 33–42

Evidence-Based Recommendations for the Treatment of Aggression in Pediatric Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Original Paper

Abstract

An evidence-based practice project was completed to develop best practice recommendations for the treatment of aggression in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Ovid Medline, PsychInfo, the National Guidelines Clearinghouse, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched with limits set for English language, years 1996 to January 2010. A search of the pediatric literature was conducted for synthesized evidence in the form of meta-analyses, systematic reviews, or practice guidelines related to the treatment of aggression in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Data were extracted using the LEGEND system. Three evidence-based care recommendations for the management of aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD were developed with an associated grade for the body of evidence. First-line pharmacotherapy for aggressive behavior in children and adolescents with ADHD should be ADHD medications. Additional research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of psychiatric medications on signs of aggression within the context of ADHD.

Keywords

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Aggression Pediatric Treatment Care recommendations 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Health Policy and Clinical EffectivenessCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Child and Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry ServiceCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and the University of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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