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Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 79, Issue 1, pp 65–79 | Cite as

Implementation and Effect of Life Space Crisis Intervention in Special Schools with Residential Treatment for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD)

  • Franky D’Oosterlinck
  • Ilse Goethals
  • Eric Boekaert
  • Gilberte Schuyten
  • Jessica De Maeyer
Original Paper

Abstract

The increase of violence in present-day society calls for adequate crisis interventions for students with behavioral problems. Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) is a systematic and formatted response to a student’s crisis, based on cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic and developmental theory. The following research article evaluates a LSCI Program with students referred to special schools with residential treatment because of severe behavioral problems. The evaluation was conducted using a quasi experimental pre-test–post-test control group design. Thirty-one match paired students were pre-tested before the interventions started and post-tested after a period of 11 months. Five standardized questionnaires were examined to assess the effectiveness of the LSCI Program. General Linear Model (GLM) with repeated measures was used to analyze all data. For the total group of subjects (n = 62) it was found that students’ perception about their athletic competence decrease significantly after 11 months in residential care. A positive effect of LSCI was found on direct aggression and social desirability.

Keywords

Adolescents Conflict managment Emotional and behavioral disorders Special education Residential care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franky D’Oosterlinck
    • 1
  • Ilse Goethals
    • 2
  • Eric Boekaert
    • 2
  • Gilberte Schuyten
    • 3
  • Jessica De Maeyer
    • 2
  1. 1.OOBC ‘Nieuwe Vaart’GhentBelgium
  2. 2.Department of OrthopedagogicsUniversity of GhentGhentBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Data-analysisUniversity of GhentGhentBelgium

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