Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 77, Issue 2, pp 119–128

A NATIONAL SURVEY OF STATE MENTAL HEALTH AUTHORITY PROGRAMS AND POLICIES FOR CLIENTS WHO ARE PARENTS: A DECADE LATER

  • Kathleen Biebel
  • Joanne Nicholson
  • Jeffrey Geller
  • William Fisher
Article

This study presents a survey of State Mental Health Authorities’ (SMHA) programs and policies addressing the needs of adult clients in their role as parent. Six program and policy areas (parent status identification, parent-focused residential programs, parent functioning assessment, outpatient services for parents, policies for hospitalized parents, and policies for hospitalized pregnant women) are examined. Results of the most recent 1999 survey are compared with results from a similar 1990 survey. This comparison reveals that the majority of SMHAs continue to overlook adult clients in their parenting role, and few SMHA programs and policies address issues of parenting.

Key Words

state mental health authority parents mental health policy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Biebel
    • 1
    • 5
  • Joanne Nicholson
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Geller
    • 3
  • William Fisher
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Family MedicineUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  5. 5.Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA

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