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Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 76, Issue 3, pp 271–281 | Cite as

The Use of Psychostimulants in Pervasive Developmental Disorders

  • Patricia Karen Abanilla
  • Greg A. Hannahs
  • Robyn Wechsler
  • Raul R. Silva
Article

Abstract

Many children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) display problematic behaviors similar to those seen in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This paper will look at the controversy concerning diagnosing comorbid ADHD in children who meet criteria for PDD and review the existing literature examining the efficacy of stimulants in these particular set of behaviors or symptom clusters (hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention). The potential drawbacks of using stimulants in a population of children and adolescents who exhibit symptoms of PDD and ADHD will be discussed. Finally, this review will also attempt to define potential areas of future research to examine the utility of the psychostimulants in children and adolescents with PDD and symptoms of ADHD.

Key words

pervasive developmental disorder mental retardation attention deficit hyperactivity disorder stimulants 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Karen Abanilla
    • 1
    • 2
  • Greg A. Hannahs
    • 1
  • Robyn Wechsler
    • 1
  • Raul R. Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryNew York University School of MedicineNew York
  2. 2.NYU School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryNew York

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