PROSPECTS

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 9–21 | Cite as

A comparative assessment of higher education financing in six Arab countries

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Abstract

This study analyses the policies for financing higher education in six Arab countries: Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Tunisia. It assesses the adequacy of spending on higher education, the efficiency with which resources are utilized, and the equity implications of resource allocations. Based on six detailed case studies, this comparative study is intended to highlight the common features and similarities, as well as the differences among countries in the region, in addition to best practices and success stories. It also addresses the future challenges that are likely to exert pressure on higher education finance and assesses the reform efforts undertaken by the governments in the region. Finally, it proposes alternative strategies for dealing with problems of finance in the Arab region, in light of international experiences and the region’s unique characteristics.

Keywords

Higher education finance Access Equity Quality Arab countries 

References

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of National PlanningCairoEgypt

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