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PROSPECTS

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 337–354 | Cite as

Social exclusion and school participation in India: Expanding access with equity

  • Rangachar Govinda
  • Madhumita BandyopadhyayEmail author
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Abstract

In recent years, increased demand and massive expansion have brought into Indian schools huge numbers of children who might not have attended in the past. Still, large numbers, and specific groups, of children remain excluded from schooling for various reasons, jeopardizing equitable access to elementary education. Further accentuating this inequity in provision, the quality of education remains deeply unsatisfactory, particularly for children from disadvantaged groups. This article explores the dimensions and issues related to exclusion from education and the policies and actions required to make educational expansion more equitable, which would contribute to pluralism and harmony and promote greater social cohesion.

Keywords

Social exclusion School participation India Access to education Equity 

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of Educational Planning and AdministrationNew DelhiIndia

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