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Precision Agriculture

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 285–301 | Cite as

Application of day and night digital photographs for estimating maize biophysical characteristics

  • Toshihiro SakamotoEmail author
  • Anatoly A. Gitelson
  • Brian D. Wardlow
  • Timothy J. Arkebauer
  • Shashi B. Verma
  • Andrew E. Suyker
  • Michio Shibayama
Article

Abstract

In this study, an inexpensive camera-observation system called the Crop Phenology Recording System (CPRS), which consists of a standard digital color camera (RGB cam) and a modified near-infrared (NIR) digital camera (NIR cam), was applied to estimate green leaf area index (LAI), total LAI, green leaf biomass and total dry biomass of stalks and leaves of maize. The CPRS was installed for the 2009 growing season over a rainfed maize field at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, NE, USA. The vegetation indices called Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index (VARI) and two green–red–blue (2g–r–b) were calculated from day-time RGB images taken by the standard commercially-available camera. The other vegetation index called Night-time Relative Brightness Index in NIR (NRBINIR) was calculated from night-time flash NIR images taken by the modified digital camera on which a NIR band-pass filter was attached. Sampling inspections were conducted to measure bio-physical parameters of maize in the same experimental field. The vegetation indices were compared with the biophysical parameters for a whole growing season. The VARI was found to accurately estimate green LAI (R2 = 0.99) and green leaf biomass (R2 = 0.98), as well as track seasonal changes in maize green vegetation fraction. The 2g–r–b was able to accurately estimate total LAI (R2 = 0.97). The NRBINIR showed the highest accuracy in estimation of the total dry biomass weight of the stalks and leaves (R2 = 0.99). The results show that the camera-observation system has potential for the remote assessment of maize biophysical parameters at low cost.

Keywords

VARI 2g–r–b NRBINIR Night-time flash image Dry biomass Crop phenology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the use of facilities and equipment provided by the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC), University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). We are grateful to Dr. Don Wilhite, Dr. Mike Hayes, Mr. Todd Schimelfenig and Ms. Deborah Wood of SNR for their valuable comments and research support. We offer special thanks to Mr. Tom Lowman, Lab Manager at Agricultural Meteorology Lab at Mead, for his technical support on the field investigation and the observation equipment, and to Mr. Dave Scoby for his technical support of the plant measurements of maize. We would like to thank Kazuhiro Morita in the Toyama Prefectural Agricultural Forestry and Fisheries Research Center, Wataru Takahashi in the Toyama Prefectural Office, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Department, Dr. Eiji Takada, Mr. Akihiro Inoue in the Toyama National College of Technology, Shigenori Miura in National Agricultural Research Center and Mr. Akihiko Kimura in Kimura Ouyo-Kougei, Ltd for their supports of field measurement and providing agronomic-survey data of rice and barley. This work was supported by the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science; JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihiro Sakamoto
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Anatoly A. Gitelson
    • 3
  • Brian D. Wardlow
    • 1
  • Timothy J. Arkebauer
    • 4
  • Shashi B. Verma
    • 5
  • Andrew E. Suyker
    • 5
  • Michio Shibayama
    • 2
  1. 1.National Drought Mitigation Center, School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  2. 2.Ecosystem Informatics DivisionNational Institute for Agro-Environmental SciencesTsukubaJapan
  3. 3.Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies, School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  4. 4.Department of Agronomy and HorticultureUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  5. 5.Great Plains Regional Center for Global Environmental Change, School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA

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