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Precision Agriculture

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 409–420 | Cite as

Effects on pesticide spray drift of the physicochemical properties of the spray liquid

  • Mieke De SchampheleireEmail author
  • David Nuyttens
  • Katrijn Baetens
  • Wim Cornelis
  • Donald Gabriels
  • Pieter Spanoghe
Article

Abstract

This research was on the effect of the physicochemical properties of the spray liquid on pesticide spray drift. Ten pesticide spray liquids with various physicochemical properties were selected for study. Some of these spray liquids were also examined with the addition of a polymer drift-retardant. In the first part, laboratory tests were performed to measure surface tension, viscosity, evaporation rate and density of the spray liquids. Subsequently, drift experiments were performed in a wind tunnel. From the results it was found that the dynamic surface tension is a major drift-determining factor, and also that the addition of a polymer drift-retardant can reduce drift significantly by increasing the viscosity. Drift reduction was found to be less effective with spray liquids of emulsifiable and suspendable formulation types than with spray liquids of water-dispersible granules and powders.

Keywords

Spray drift Pesticide Physicochemical properties Surface tension Viscosity 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mieke De Schampheleire
    • 1
    Email author
  • David Nuyttens
    • 2
  • Katrijn Baetens
    • 3
  • Wim Cornelis
    • 4
  • Donald Gabriels
    • 4
  • Pieter Spanoghe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Crop ProtectionGhent UniversityGentBelgium
  2. 2.Agricultural and Fishery Research Institute (ILVO)MerelbekeBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Agro-Engineering and EconomicsCatolic University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  4. 4.Department of Soil Management and Soil CareGhent UniversityGentBelgium

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