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Transportation

, Volume 45, Issue 6, pp 1687–1700 | Cite as

Trip misreporting forecast using count data model in a GPS enhanced travel survey

  • Md. Sakoat Hossan
  • Hamidreza Asgari
  • Xia Jin
Article
  • 143 Downloads

Abstract

As Global Positioning System (GPS) technology advances, it has been increasingly used to supplement traditional self-reported travel surveys due to its promising features in capturing travel data with better accuracy and reliability. Realizing the limitations of diary-based surveys, this paper presents a study that directly accounts for trip misreporting behavior in trip generation models. Travel data were obtained from prompted-recall assisted GPS survey along with a diary-based survey. Negative Binomial models for count data were developed to accommodate misreporting behavior by introducing interaction effects of the sample-indicator variable with various personal and household variables. The interaction effects indicate how the impacts of the socioeconomic and demographic variables on trip-making vary across the two samples. Assuming that the GPS sample represents the ground truth, the interaction effects actually capture the likelihood and the extent of trip misreporting by detailed personal and household characteristics. The model results reveal significant interaction effects of several personal and household variables, indicating misreporting behavior associated with these attributes. The addition of interaction coefficients to the main effect model represents the real impacts of the independent variables, after compensating for trip misreporting behavior, if any.

Keywords

Trip misreporting Count data model Interaction effect Trip generation model Household travel survey Global positioning system 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Data for this study were obtained from the regional household travel survey conducted by the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council (NYMTC). The GPS survey was conducted by GeoStats, who performed the initial data cleaning and processing work and provided the documentation regarding the GPS sample.

Authors would also like to mention that the following two papers use the same data discussed in this research work, but they focus on different aspects and different modeling techniques:

Jin, X., Asgari, H., Hossan, Md.: Understanding Trip Misreporting Behavior Using Global Positioning System-Assisted Household Travel Survey. In ‘Mobile Technologies for Activity‐Travel Data Collection and Analysis’, Chapter 6, IGI Global, 2014. doi: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6170-7 (2014).

Jin, X., Asgari, H., Hossan, Md.: Understanding Trip Misreporting in Household Travel Surveys by Comparing GPS-Assisted and Diary-Based Samples. CICTP 2014: pp. 3401-3412. doi: 10.1061/9780784413623.326 (2014).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA

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