Phytochemistry Reviews

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 593–598 | Cite as

Design of bioreactors suitable for plant cell and tissue cultures

Article

Abstract

Plant cell suspension cultures and hairy roots are potential sources of secondary metabolites and recombinant proteins. In contrast to traditionally grown “whole wild plants” or “whole transgenic plants”, their production in bioreactors guarantees defined controlled process conditions and therefore minimizes or even prevents variations in product yield and quality, which simplifies process validation and product registration. Moreover, bioreactors and their configuration significantly affect cultivation results by accomplishing and controlling the optimum environment for effective cell growth and production of bioactive substances. This review highlights the main design criteria of the most widely used bioreactor types, both for plant cell suspension cultures and for hairy roots, and outlines suitable low-cost disposable bioreactors which have found increasing acceptance over the last 10 years.

Keywords

Disposable bioreactors Hairy roots Plant cell suspension cultures Secondary metabolites and recombinant proteins Traditional bioreactors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Life Sciences and Facility Management, Institute of BiotechnologyZurich University of Applied SciencesWadenswilSwitzerland

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