Philosophical Studies

, Volume 163, Issue 3, pp 827–835

Siegel’s get rich quick scheme

Article

References

  1. Adolphs, R. (2002). Recognizing emotion from facial expressions: Psychological and neurological mechanisms. Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews, 1, 21–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Badler, J. B., Lefèvre, P., & Missal, M. (2010). Causality attribution biases oculomotor responses. Journal of Neuroscience, 30, 10517–10525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barnett-Cowan, M., Fleming, R. W., Singh, M., & Bülthoff, H. H. (2011). Perceived object stability depends on multisensory estimates of gravity. PLoS One, 27, e19289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chao, L. L., Haxby, J. V., & Martin, A. (1999). Attribute-based neural substrates in posterior temporal cortex for perceiving and knowing about objects. Nature Neuroscience, 2, 913–919.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9, 558–565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Glezer, L. S., Jiang, X., & Riesenhuber, M. (2009). Evidence for highly selective neuronal tuning to whole words in the “visual word form area”. Neuron, 62, 199–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Kurby, C., Joseph, A., Magliano, P., & Rapp, D. (2009). Those voices in your head: Activation of auditory images during reading. Cognition, 112, 457–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Prinz, J. J. (2006). Beyond appearances: The content of perception and sensation. In T. S. Gendler & J. Hawthorne (Eds.), Perceptual experience (pp. 434–459). Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Prinz, J. J. (2011). The sensory basis of cognitive phenomenology. In T. Bayne & M. Montague (Eds.), Cognitive phenomenology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Prinz, J. J. (2012). The conscious brain. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Siegel, S. (2011). The contents of visual experience. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Vuilleumier, P., Henson, R. N., Driver, J., & Dolan, R. J. (2002). Multiple levels of visual object constancy revealed by event-related fMRI of repetition priming. Nature Neuroscience, 5, 491–499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations