Philosophical Studies

, Volume 160, Issue 3, pp 465–476

The pain of rejection, the sweetness of revenge

Article
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.The Northern Institute of PhilosophyUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenScotland

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