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Philosophical Studies

, Volume 137, Issue 1, pp 141–148 | Cite as

Recurrent transient underdetermination and the glass half full

  • Peter Godfrey-Smith
Article

Abstract

Kyle Stanford’s arguments against scientific realism are assessed, with a focus on the underdetermination of theory by evidence. I argue that discussions of underdetermination have neglected a possible symmetry which may ameliorate the situation.

Keywords

Theory Evidence Scientific realism Underdetermination Approximate truth 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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