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International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 679–681 | Cite as

What’s in a drop? Optimizing strategies for administration of drugs in pediatrics

  • Tiene BautersEmail author
  • Barbara Claus
  • Elsie Willems
  • Johan De Porre
  • Joris Verlooy
  • Yves Benoit
  • Hugo Robays
Commentary

Abstract

Accurate administration of drugs is an essential part of pharmacotherapy in children. Small differences in the amount of drugs administered, might evoke different clinical effects. This is especially of concern in drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Guided by a case that was observed in pediatrics, some practical recommendations for the administration of oral drops in children are described.

Keywords

Dosing error Medicine dropper Oral liquid devices 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Pauline Belin (University Claude Bernard, Lyon) for excellent assistance in the drop test.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiene Bauters
    • 1
    Email author
  • Barbara Claus
    • 1
  • Elsie Willems
    • 2
  • Johan De Porre
    • 2
  • Joris Verlooy
    • 2
  • Yves Benoit
    • 2
  • Hugo Robays
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacyGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology and Stem Cell TransplantationGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium

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