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Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 344–350 | Cite as

Uzbekistan Drug Airlift: a Quantitative Analysis of Public/private Collaboration

  • Albert I. WertheimerEmail author
  • Thomas M. Santella
  • Veronica M. Arroyave
Research Article
  • 38 Downloads

Abstract

Uzbekistan is a country within Central Asia resting on a precarious plane of health, economic, and social problems affecting its stability. In an effort to aid the stability of the country, the U.S. along with numerous non-government organizations (NGOs) and private organizations worked together to carry out a program entitled Operation Provide Hope 2002, a humanitarian operation responsible for the donation of over $50 million in medicines and medical supplies. An analysis of the context within which the program was carried out, along with a look at both the costs and benefits of the operation show that the benefits far outweigh the costs both in quantitative and qualitative terms.

Key words

AmeriCares Counterpart International Heart to Heart International Medical Airlift Northwest Medical Teams International Operation Provide Hope Project HOPE Uzbekistan 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert I. Wertheimer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Thomas M. Santella
    • 1
  • Veronica M. Arroyave
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Pharmaceutical Health Services ResearchTemple University School of PharmacyPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Map InternationalUSA

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