Pharmaceutical Research

, Volume 26, Issue 11, pp 2513–2522

Microneedle Arrays Allow Lower Microbial Penetration Than Hypodermic Needles In Vitro

  • Ryan F. Donnelly
  • Thakur Raghu Raj Singh
  • Michael M. Tunney
  • Desmond I. J. Morrow
  • Paul A. McCarron
  • Conor O’Mahony
  • A. David Woolfson
Research Paper

Abstract

Methods

In this study we determined, for the first time, the ability of microorganisms to traverse microneedle-induced holes using two different in vitro models.

Results

When employing Silescol® membranes, the numbers of Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis crossing the membranes were an order of magnitude lower when the membranes were punctured by microneedles rather than a 21G hypodermic needle. Apart from the movement of C. albicans across hypodermic needle-punctured membranes, where 40.2% of the microbial load on control membranes permeated the barrier over 24 h, the numbers of permeating microorganisms was less than 5% of the original microbial load on control membranes. Experiments employing excised porcine skin and radiolabelled microorganisms showed that the numbers of microorganisms penetrating skin beyond the stratum corneum were approximately an order of magnitude greater than the numbers crossing Silescol® membranes in the corresponding experiments. Approximately 103 cfu of each microorganism adhered to hypodermic needles during insertion. The numbers of microorganisms adhering to MN arrays were an order of magnitude higher in each case.

Conclusion

We have shown here that microneedle puncture resulted in significantly less microbial penetration than did hypodermic needle puncture and that no microorganisms crossed the viable epidermis in microneedle—punctured skin, in contrast to needle-punctured skin. Given the antimicrobial properties of skin, it is, therefore, likely that application of microneedle arrays to skin in an appropriate manner would not cause either local or systemic infection in normal circumstances in immune-competent patients. In supporting widespread clinical use of microneedle-based delivery systems, appropriate animal studies are now needed to conclusively demonstrate this in vivo. Safety in patients will be enhanced by aseptic or sterile manufacture and by fabricating microneedles from self-disabling materials (e.g. dissolving or biodegradable polymers) to prevent inappropriate or accidental reuse.

Key Words

infection microneedle arrays microorganisms stratum corneum 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan F. Donnelly
    • 1
  • Thakur Raghu Raj Singh
    • 1
  • Michael M. Tunney
    • 1
  • Desmond I. J. Morrow
    • 1
  • Paul A. McCarron
    • 2
  • Conor O’Mahony
    • 3
  • A. David Woolfson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PharmacyQueen’s University Belfast, Medical Biology CentreBelfastUK
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of UlsterColeraineUK
  3. 3.Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect RowCorkIreland

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