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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 48, Issue 8, pp 529–533 | Cite as

Cytotoxic Triterpene from Barringtonia asiatica

  • Consolacion Y. Ragasa
  • Dinah L. Espineli
  • Chien-Chang Shen
Article

Triterpenes isolated from the dichloromethane extract of Barringtonia asiatica, namely, a mixture of betulinic acid (1) and 22-O-tigloylcamelliagenin A (2) in a 1 : 2 ratio and a mixture of 3β-olean-18-en-3-yl palmitate (7), 3β-urs-12-en-3-yl palmitate (8) and 3β-olean-12-en-3-yl palmitate (9) in a 4 : 1 : 2 ratio (isolated from the bark), as well as germanicol caffeoyl ester (3), germanicol trans-coumaroyl ester (4), germanicol cis-coumaroyl ester (5) and germanicol (6) (from the leaves), and a phenolic compound, verimol K (10) from the flowers, were assessed for cytotoxicity against a human cancer cell line, colon carcinoma (HCT 116), using the MTT assay. The mixture of 1 and 2 exhibited IC50 =8.0 μg · mL–1 against this cell line, while 6 exhibited an IC50 value of 29.6 μg · mL–1. The other compounds tested (35, 710) were inactive against the HCT 116 cell line. The mixture of 1 and 2 and compound 6 were further tested for cytotoxicity against the non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cell line. The mixture of 1 and 2 and compound 6 exhibited IC50 values of 6.0 and 35.6 μg · mL–1, respectively. The cytotoxicity for the mixture of 1 and 2 may be attributed to betulinic acid (1), a known cytotoxic compound.

Keywords

Barringtonia asiatica Lecythidaceae betulinic acid germanicol MTT cytotoxic activity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

A research grant from the Centennial Fund of De La Salle University — Manila is gratefully acknowledged. The MTT assay was conducted at the Institute of Biology, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Consolacion Y. Ragasa
    • 1
  • Dinah L. Espineli
    • 1
  • Chien-Chang Shen
    • 2
  1. 1.Chemistry Department and Center for Natural Sciences and Ecological ResearchDe La Salle UniversityManilaPhilippines
  2. 2.National Research Institute of Chinese MedicineTaipeiTaiwan

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