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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 40, Issue 11, pp 614–619 | Cite as

Antidepressant activity of some phytopharmaceuticals and phenylpropanoids

  • V. A. Kurkin
  • A. V. Dubishchev
  • V. N. Ezhkov
  • I. N. Titova
  • E. V. Avdeeva
Medicinal Plants

Abstract

The antidepressant activity of some phytopreparations and phenylpropanoids was studied in white rats, which were subjected to the desperation test and neuropharmacological tests based on the antagonist activity with respect to reserpine, clofelin, and L-DOPA. The most pronounced effect was exhibited by the extract of Eleutherococcus senticosus, which produced a 56.4% decrease in the immobilization period in rats that was comparable with, albeit somewhat lower than the effect of amitriptyline (73.5%). The antidepressant effects of other phytopreparations decreased in the following order: Rhodiola rosea (53.8%), Echinacea purpurea (49%), and Schizandra chinensis (29.8%). Among phenylpropanoids, the maximum antidepressant effects were produced by syringin and rosavin (49.7% and 29.5%, respectively). The most pronounced antagonism with respect to reserpine was also observed for syringin. The tinctures of Echinacea purpurea and Schizandra chinensis, as well as phenylpropanoid triandrin produced the maximum antidepressant effect in the clofelin-induced depression test. An increase in the stimulating action of L-DOPA was observed upon the administration of rosavin and the tinctures of Schizandra chinensis and Echinacea purpurea.

Keywords

Reserpine Antidepressant Activity Silybin Immobilization Time Echinacea Purpurea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Kurkin
    • 1
  • A. V. Dubishchev
    • 1
  • V. N. Ezhkov
    • 1
  • I. N. Titova
    • 1
  • E. V. Avdeeva
    • 1
  1. 1.Samara State Medical UniversitySamaraRussia

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