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Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 783–797 | Cite as

Low Temperature Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration by Atmospheric Air Non-thermal Plasma Injection System

  • Yunxi ShiEmail author
  • Yixi Cai
  • Xiaohua Li
  • Hui Xu
  • Weijun Li
  • Xiaoyu Pu
Original Paper

Abstract

An experimental study of the regeneration of diesel particulate filter (DPF) was conducted through the use of a self-designed Non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection system with an experimental temperature of 20–300 °C, with atmospheric air being used as the gas source. The results revealed that the PM could be broken down into CO and CO2 by NTP, through a discharge reaction of the NTP reactor. As the temperature increases, the mass of C1 (mass of C in CO) showed an overall declining trend. Interestingly, the mass of C2 (mass of C in CO2) and C12 (the sum of C1 and C2) both showed an initial increase, followed by a decrease. The peak mass of C12 appears at 150 °C, and both axial and radial temperature gradients are less than the limit of DPF temperature gradient at this temperature. In conclusion, DPF can be regenerated by the NTP technology at a lower temperature, which can aid in the avoidance of thermal damage of DPF. The technology boasts a great advantage in adopting atmospheric air as its gas source, which can not only reduce costs, but also is convenient.

Keywords

Diesel engine Diesel particulate filter Regeneration Non-thermal plasma Air Temperature 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is currently supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176067), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions ([2011]No.6), and the Graduate Students Scientific Research Innovation Project of Jiangsu Ordinary University (KYLX15_1070).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yunxi Shi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yixi Cai
    • 1
  • Xiaohua Li
    • 1
  • Hui Xu
    • 1
  • Weijun Li
    • 1
  • Xiaoyu Pu
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Automotive and Traffic EngineeringJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangChina

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