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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 66, Issue 2, pp 213–223 | Cite as

Assessing the Psychological Type Profile of Canadian Baptist Youth: A Study Employing the Francis Psychological Type Scales for Adolescents (FPTSA)

  • Bruce Fawcett
  • Leslie J. FrancisEmail author
  • Jody Linkletter
  • Mandy Robbins
  • Dale Stairs
Article
  • 71 Downloads

Abstract

A growing body of international research employing psychological type theory within the context of congregation studies has drawn attention to the way in which churches draw larger numbers of feeling types than thinking types (among both men and women). These studies have focused on adult churchgoers. The present study extends this field of research among 1630 Canadian Baptist youth attending church-based summer youth programmes (aged 12 to 19 years) who completed the Francis Psychological Type Scales for Adolescents. In this new study, 87 % of male youth and 93 % of female youth preferred feeling. The implications of these findings are assessed for the ministry of the Church among thinking types.

Keywords

Psychological type Congregation studies Baptist church Young people Psychology of religion 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce Fawcett
    • 1
  • Leslie J. Francis
    • 2
    Email author
  • Jody Linkletter
    • 3
  • Mandy Robbins
    • 4
  • Dale Stairs
    • 3
  1. 1.Crandall UniversityMonctonCanada
  2. 2.Warwick Religions & Education Research Unit, Centre for Education StudiesThe University of WarwickCoventryUK
  3. 3.Acadia Divinity CollegeWolfvilleCanada
  4. 4.Glyndŵr UniversityWrexhamUK

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