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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 55, Issue 5, pp 571–591 | Cite as

Augustine’s Confessions: Self-reproach and the Melancholy Self

  • Donald Capps
Original Paper

Abstract

This article, companion to my article, “Augustine’s Confessions: The Story of a Divided Self and the Process of Its Unification” (Capps, 2007), focuses on psychoanalytic studies of Augustine’s Confessions, giving particular attention to his tendency to engage in self-reproach. The psychodynamic meanings of such self-reproach are explored, and the proposal is made that his Confessions reveal both narcissistic personality trends (in which shame plays a major role) and a melancholy self (in which the mother-son relationship is central).

Keywords

Augustine Psychoanalysis Self-reproach Narcissistic personality Shame Melancholy self Mother-son relationship 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Princeton Theological SeminaryPrincetonUSA

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