Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 76, Issue 1, pp 51–65 | Cite as

Reducing Restraints: Alternatives to Restraints on an Inpatient Psychiatric Service—Utilizing Safe and Effective Methods to Evaluate and Treat the Violent Patient

  • Ann M. Sullivan
  • Janet Bezmen
  • Charles T. Barron
  • James Rivera
  • Linda Curley-Casey
  • Dominic Marino
Article

This paper describes the violence safety program instituted at Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York City in 2001, which significantly reduced the use of restraints and seclusion department wide, while providing a safe and therapeutic environment for patient recovery. The hospital service and program instituted is described, followed by restraint and seclusion data since 1998, and the program’s results through 2003. Concurrent data in areas that could be affected by a reduction in restraint and seclusion such as self-injurious behaviors and altercations; use of emergency medication; use of special observation and length of stay data are also presented. In addition, types and frequency of alternative methods utilized to avoid restraints and seclusion are described.

Keywords

restraint seclusion reduction alternative methods 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann M. Sullivan
    • 1
  • Janet Bezmen
    • 2
  • Charles T. Barron
    • 1
  • James Rivera
    • 1
  • Linda Curley-Casey
    • 2
  • Dominic Marino
    • 1
  1. 1.Elmhurst Hospital CenterMt. Sinai School of MedicineElmhurst
  2. 2.Elmhurst Hospital CenterElmhurst

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