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Graphene-based Mach–Zehnder nanophotonics interferometer working as a splitter/switch and as a multiplexer/demultiplexer

  • A. Wirth LimaJr.Email author
  • A. S. B. Sombra
Article
  • 148 Downloads

Abstract

We developed and are presenting a graphene-based nanophotonic Mach–Zehnder Interferometer (MZI), which can operate as a signal follower, switch and splitter and as a multiplexer/demultiplexer. Due to the excellent electrical/optical parameters inherent to the graphene, we showed that the device we are presenting can works in several different ways, which can not be supported by MZI based on conventional materials. It is worth mentioning that the operations of the device we have developed take into account the electrical/optical parameters of the graphene, which provide greater versatility and efficiency compared to the MZIs manufactured with conventional materials. In addition, these parameters can be controlled via, for example, gate voltage, so that many operations can be performed in parallel, which is also not possible through the use of conventional materials. Due to its manometric dimensions, this MZI can be integrated within photonic integrated circuits, so that we can use this device in dense wavelength division multiplexing optical communications.

Keywords

Demultiplexer Graphene Multiplexeer MZI Switch Splitter 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was partly sponsored by the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). To Prof. Dr. Victor Dmitriev Alexandrovic, (UFPA) for calculations using the COMSOL.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Telecommunications and Materials Science and EngineeringFortalezaBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Physics, Science CenterFederal University of Ceará (U.F.C.)FortalezaBrazil

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