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Policy Sciences

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 249–278 | Cite as

Sharing natural resource management responsibility: Examining the New Zealand rock lobster co-management experience

  • Tracy YandleEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Co-management, in which government and resource users share responsibility for managing a natural resource, is attracting considerable attention in both public policy and common pool resource research. However, little is understood about how this approach arises in a mature regulatory setting, or about its strengths and weaknesses. This study uses the experience of the New Zealand rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii and Sagmariasus verreauxi) industry to illustrate what co-management is and how it develops. This is followed by an assessment of co-management in this regime. Development of co-management is an evolutionary process that requires commitment from both government and industry. Strengthened property rights and management expertise provide the incentives and tools to develop a robust co-management regime. However the characteristics of the property rights bundle must be carefully matched to the regime’s biological, social, and regulatory setting.

Keywords

Co-management Natural resource management Fisheries New Zealand Rock lobster Jasus edwardsii Sagmariasus verreauxi Common-Pool Resource (CPR) Property rights Individual Tradable Quota (ITQ) 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLP 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Environmental StudiesEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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