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Natural Hazards

, Volume 92, Issue 3, pp 1321–1353 | Cite as

Damage to buildings and structures due to recent devastating wind hazards in East Asia

  • Qingshan Yang
  • Rong Gao
  • Fan Bai
  • Tian Li
  • Yukio Tamura
Original Paper

Abstract

Extreme wind events such as typhoons and tornadoes can cause devastating damage to structures and huge losses to human societies. This paper introduces recent devastating wind-related disasters in East Asia, including disasters in Japan, the Philippines and China, from 2013 to 2016. In particular, it describes several post-disaster investigations including those on Typhoon Haiyan in 2013 in the Philippines; typhoon Mujigae and two typhoon-associated tornadoes in October, 2015, in Guangdong, China; and a tornado in June, 2016 in Yancheng, China. Meteorological features, damage details and failure mechanisms of structures, factors related to damage generation and spread, scales to evaluate storms, estimations of tornado wind speeds and so on are discussed, with the aim of mitigating future wind-related disasters and to create safer and sustainable societies. Lessons derived from aerodynamic effects, cladding and component performances, debris impacts, building arrangements, fatigue effects, construction methods, etc. together with suggestions for wind-resistant design of buildings are given.

Keywords

Wind-related disaster Typhoon Tornado Damage survey East Asia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The post-disaster investigation in the Philippines on Typhoon Haiyan was conducted by the team of the JICA Expert Mission on Resiliency of School Buildings for the Post-Bohol Earthquake/Typhoon Yolanda Disaster in cooperation with the JICA Philippines Office. The authors are grateful to the members of the JICA team, especially to Dr. Yasushi Sanada, Mr. Tatsuo Narafu, Dr. Toyokazu Shimizu, Dr. Noriyuki Mita, for their kind collaborations and useful discussions. The post-disaster investigation in Guangdong on Typhoon Mujigae and two typhoon-associated tornadoes was conducted in cooperation with Dr. Shuyang Cao, Mr. Yongjun Zhu and the Nancun Village Government provided great help to the team, they are grateful acknowledged. Some investigations were made at Zhujiang Light Co., Ltd. and CCDI Co., Ltd. with their kind cooperation, and the Zhanjiang Meteorological Administration provided some useful information. Mr. Haiming Wang and Mr. Dong Xiang gave the authors great help during the investigation in Yancheng, the Funding Meteorological Administration also provided useful information and great support to the team. This study was also supported in part by the 111 Project and the 1000 Foreign Experts Program in China, the Beijing advanced innovation center for future urban design also provided many help to this work. The financial support from the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 106112017CDJQJ208849) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51720105005) are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qingshan Yang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Rong Gao
    • 2
    • 3
  • Fan Bai
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tian Li
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yukio Tamura
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Civil EngineeringChongqing UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.School of Civil EngineeringBeijing Jiaotong UniversityBeijingChina
  3. 3.Beijing’s Key Laboratory of Structural Wind Engineering and Urban Wind EnvironmentBeijingChina
  4. 4.Wind Engineering Joint Usage/Research CenterTokyo Polytechnic UniversityTokyoJapan

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