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Natural Hazards

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 93–109 | Cite as

Tidal inundation mapping under enhanced land subsidence in Semarang, Central Java Indonesia

  • Muh Aris MarfaiEmail author
  • Lorenz King
Original Paper

Abstract

Tidal inundation by high tide under enhanced land subsidence is a damaging phenomenon and a major threat to the Semarang urban area in Indonesia. It impacts on economic activities, as well as the cost of an emergency program and causes interruption of pubic services, danger of infectious diseases and injury to human lives. This study examines a spatial analysis tool on the GIS-raster system for the tidal inundation mapping based on the subsidence-benchmark data and modified detail digital elevation model. Neighborhood operation and iteration model as a spatial analysis tool have been applied in order to calculate the encroachment of the tidal inundation on the coastal area. The resulting map shows that the tidal flood spreads to the lowland area and causes the inundation of coastal settlement, infrastructure, as well as productive agricultural land, i.e., the fish-pond area. The monitoring of the vulnerable area due to the tidal inundation under the scenario of extended land subsidence plays an important role in long-term coastal zone management in Semarang.

Keywords

Land subsidence Tidal inundation Neighborhood operation and iteration Semarang Indonesia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This article derives from research in progress by M.A. Marfai on risk assessment of tidal inundation under the scenarios of sea level rise and land subsidence. This project is being done at the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany, supported by The German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). The authors express their gratitude to the reviewers for their helpful advice.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of GeographyJustus-Liebig-UniversityGiessenGermany
  2. 2.Geography FacultyGadjah Mada UniversityYogyakartaIndonesia

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