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Natural Hazards

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 267–280 | Cite as

Towards an integrated management framework for emerging disaster risks in Japan

  • Saburo Ikeda
  • Teruko Sato
  • Teruki Fukuzono
Original Paper

Abstract

An integrated framework for disaster risk management is presented to cope with the risk of low-probability high-consequence (LPHC) disasters in urban communities. Since the 2000 Tokai flood in Japan, there has been a shift in the management strategy from disaster prevention with a presumed zero risk to disaster reduction with an acceptable risk. The framework consists of: (i) integration of a different categories of risk reduction options in terms of structural and nonstructural measures, regulation and market-oriented measures, (ii) strengthening of the capacity of local communities to make their own management choices for LPHC-type disaster risks, and (iii) promoting the participation of stakeholders throughout the entire cycle of risk management.

The interdisciplinary framework is discussed with reference to lessons learned from two recent major flood disasters (the 2000 Tokai flood and the 2004 Niigata flood). To implement the goals of the integrated framework, a participatory platform for disaster risk communication called “Pafrics” has been developed. Preliminary results of the pilot study of participation and risk communication supported by Pafrics are presented.

Keywords

Disaster risk Integrated risk management Emerging risk Stakeholder participation Risk communication 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors thank the anonymous referees and editor for their thoughtful comments and suggestions, which have improved our article. This work was supported by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan, as a project for “Research on Societal Systems Resilient to Natural Disasters (2001–2005)”. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the NIED.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster PreventionTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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