Neuropsychology Review

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 367–384

Diagnostic and Assessment Findings: A Bridge to Academic Planning for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Stephen M. Kanne
  • Jena K. Randolph
  • Janet E. Farmer
Article

Abstract

Increasing numbers of children diagnosed and treated for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has impacted both neuropsychologists and educators. Though both play key evaluative and treatment roles, there is no available method or process in place enabling the translation of the neuropsychological report recommendations into a format educational teams can easily use, leading to a gap between neuropsychological recommendations and educational planning. In the following, we review the areas evaluated by a neuropsychologist when assessing a child with an ASD, discuss the domains targeted by educational teams when designing an educational plan, and then present a process that has met with some success creating a “bridge” between the diagnostic/assessment process and the subsequent academic planning. Though presented in the context of ASD, the process described can be used by neuropsychologists for various populations to facilitate partnerships with educators that result in improved care for the child.

Keywords

Autism IEP Special education Pediatric neuropsychology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen M. Kanne
    • 1
  • Jena K. Randolph
    • 2
  • Janet E. Farmer
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Health PsychologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special EducationUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental DisordersUniversity of Missouri—ColumbiaColumbiaUSA

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