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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 140, Issue 1, pp 179–180 | Cite as

Everolimus shortens survival of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

  • Eric T. Wong
  • Kenneth D. Swanson
Letter to the Editor

To the Editor,

RTOG 0913 is a randomized phase II trial testing the effects of everolimus added to standard radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastomas [1]. As pointed out by the authors, this is the largest study to date investigating the efficacy of an mTOR inhibitor for glioblastoma. Unfortunately, everolimus did not improve either PFS or OS in the trial subjects. In fact, those taking the medication died sooner by an average of 4.7 months and they experienced more frequent grade 4 and 5 adverse events. Among them, serious infections were more common in the experimental group than in the control population.

Preclinical work has shown that mTOR functions to transduce signals in glioma cells that are necessary for their survival and proliferation. Logically, an inhibitor of mTOR like everolimus (marketed as Afinitor®, https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2012/022334s016lbl.pdf) might be expected to halt tumor progression...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

References

  1. 1.
    Chinnaiyan P, Won M, Wen PY et al (2018) A randomized phase II study of everolimus in combination with chemoradiation in newly diagnosed glioblastoma: results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0913. Neuro-Oncol 20(5):666–673CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wong ET, Lok E, Gautam S, Swanson KD (2015) Dexamethasone exerts profound immunologic interference on treatment efficacy for recurrent glioblastoma. Br J Cancer 113(2):232–241CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pitter KL, Tamagno I, Alikhanyan K et al (2016) Corticosteroids compromise survival in glioblastoma. Brain 139(5):1458–1471CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Brain Tumor Center and Neuro-Oncology Unit, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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