Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 134, Issue 2, pp 363–369 | Cite as

A cross sectional analysis from a single institution’s experience of psychosocial distress and health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population

  • Dina M. Randazzo
  • Frances McSherry
  • James E. HerndonII
  • Mary Lou Affronti
  • Eric S. Lipp
  • Charlene Flahiff
  • Elizabeth Miller
  • Sarah Woodring
  • Maria Freeman
  • Patrick Healy
  • Janet Minchew
  • Susan Boulton
  • Annick Desjardins
  • Gordana Vlahovic
  • Henry S. Friedman
  • Stephen Keir
  • Katherine B. Peters
Clinical Study

Abstract

Primary brain tumor patients experience high levels of distress. The purpose of this cross-sectional, retrospective study is to evaluate the level and different sources of psychosocial distress and how these pertain to health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Primary and Recurrent Glioma registry at Duke’s The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center was queried retrospectively for demographic and clinical information on patients seen between December 2013 and February 2014. Data also included the National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Distress Thermometer (NCCN-DT), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain Cancer (FACT-Br), and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Fatigue (FACIT-F). 829 subjects completed questionnaires. 54% were male; 96% completed the NCCN-DT; 33.3% had a DT score ≥4 (moderate/severe distress). Women reported DT ≥ 4 more often than men (38.6 vs 29.0%; p = 0.005). Patients within 1 year of diagnosis reported DT ≥ 4 more often than those 1+ years after diagnosis (38.8 vs 30.9%; p = 0.034). 73.0% reported physical problems; the most frequent being fatigue (43.2%) and memory/concentration (40.9%). 42.0% complained of emotional problems with worry (29.4%) and nervousness (22.4%) being the most common. Patients who reported at least one practical, family, emotional or physical problem had significantly lower HRQoL scores (p < 0.001). Primary brain tumor patients experience memory dysfunction, fatigue, nervousness, worry, and financial concerns, which have a negative effect on the patient’s HRQoL. By identifying and addressing these stressors, it may be possible to improve patient HRQoL.

Keywords

Brain Cancer Psychosocial Distress HRQoL 

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 14 KB)
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Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 14 KB)
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Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 15 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dina M. Randazzo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frances McSherry
    • 4
  • James E. HerndonII
    • 4
  • Mary Lou Affronti
    • 3
    • 5
  • Eric S. Lipp
    • 3
  • Charlene Flahiff
    • 3
  • Elizabeth Miller
    • 3
  • Sarah Woodring
    • 3
  • Maria Freeman
    • 3
  • Patrick Healy
    • 4
  • Janet Minchew
    • 3
  • Susan Boulton
    • 3
  • Annick Desjardins
    • 2
  • Gordana Vlahovic
    • 3
  • Henry S. Friedman
    • 3
  • Stephen Keir
    • 3
  • Katherine B. Peters
    • 2
  1. 1.Duke University Health SystemThe Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at DukeDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Neuro-SurgeryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Department of Biostatistics and BioinformaticsDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Duke University School of NursingDurhamUSA

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