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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 113, Issue 3, pp 359–363 | Cite as

High plasma-GFAP levels in metastatic myxopapillary ependymoma

  • Ayseguel Ilhan-Mutlu
  • Anna S. Berghoff
  • Julia Furtner
  • Karin Dieckmann
  • Irene Slavc
  • Thomas Czech
  • Christine Marosi
  • Ludwig Wagner
  • Matthias PreusserEmail author
Laboratory Investigation

Abstract

Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare tumor of the distal spinal cord. Despite benign histopathology, local recurrences occur in ~30 % of patients and distant metastases have been described in few cases. MPE tumor cells typically express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), which could be released to the circulation. In this current report, we investigated circulating plasma-GFAP in a series of MPE patients. We analyzed circulating plasma-GFAP using a commercially available ELISA kit in 3 patients with completely resected MPE, 1 patient with locally advanced MPE and 2 patients with pleuropulmonary metastases of MPE. As controls we used blood samples of age and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n = 3), 6 glioblastoma patients with known plasma-GFAP status (positive for 3 and negative for 3 patients) and 3 brain metastases patients with known plasma-GFAP negativity. We found very high concentrations of plasma-GFAP in two MPE patients with pleuropulmonary metastases, while in none of the other MPE patients circulating plasma-GFAP was detectable. Circulating GFAP could be useful as marker for early detection or follow-up of distant metastases in MPE patients.

Keywords

Myxopapillary ependymoma GFAP Plasma Pleuropulmonary metastases Glioblastoma 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank all patients and our colleagues Dr. Roland Hansen (Aachen, Germany) and Dr. Mila Petrova (Sofia, Bulgaria) for their support and cooperation.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest with regard to the content of the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayseguel Ilhan-Mutlu
    • 1
    • 8
  • Anna S. Berghoff
    • 2
    • 8
  • Julia Furtner
    • 3
    • 8
  • Karin Dieckmann
    • 4
    • 8
  • Irene Slavc
    • 5
    • 8
  • Thomas Czech
    • 6
    • 8
  • Christine Marosi
    • 1
    • 8
  • Ludwig Wagner
    • 7
    • 8
  • Matthias Preusser
    • 1
    • 8
    • 9
    Email author
  1. 1.Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine IMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Institute for NeurologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.Clinical Division of Neuro-radiology, Department of RadiologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  4. 4.Department of RadiotherapyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.Clinical Division of Paediatric Neuro-oncology, Department of PaediatricsMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  6. 6.Department of NeurosurgeryMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  7. 7.Department of NephrologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  8. 8.Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Central Nervous System Tumours UnitMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  9. 9.Department of Medicine I and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS)Medical University of ViennaViennaAustria

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