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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 107, Issue 1, pp 133–138 | Cite as

Phase I study of panobinostat in combination with bevacizumab for recurrent high-grade glioma

  • J. Drappatz
  • E. Q. Lee
  • S. Hammond
  • S. A. Grimm
  • A. D. Norden
  • R. Beroukhim
  • M. Gerard
  • D. Schiff
  • A. S. Chi
  • T. T. Batchelor
  • L. M. Doherty
  • A. S. Ciampa
  • D. C. LaFrankie
  • S. Ruland
  • S. M. Snodgrass
  • J. J. Raizer
  • P. Y. Wen
Clinical Study – Patient Study

Abstract

Bevacizumab is frequently used to treat patients with recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG), but responses are generally not durable. Panobinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with anti-neoplastic and anti-angiogenic effects and may work synergistically with VEGF inhibitors. We performed a phase I study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the combination of orally administered panobinostat with bevacizumab in patients with recurrent HGG. Patients with recurrent HGG were treated on a 3 + 3 trial design. Patients received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every other week in combination with oral panobinostat. The starting dose of panobinostat was 20 mg three times per week, weekly (cohort 1). Due to concerns for thrombocytopenia with the weekly dosing regimen, the protocol was amended to examine an every other week regimen. Cohort 2 received panobinostat 20 mg three times per week, every other week, and cohort 3 received 30 mg three times per week, every other week. Dose-limiting toxicity during the first 30 days was used to determine the maximum-tolerated dose. Twelve patients (median age 50, median KPS 90) with recurrent HGG were enrolled. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) (Grade 3 thrombocytopenia) was observed in cohort 1. No DLTs were observed in cohorts 2 and 3. The following grade 3 toxicities were seen in one patient each: thrombocytopenia, hypophosphatemia, esophageal hemorrhage, and deep venous thrombosis. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities. There were three patients with partial responses and seven with stable disease. The recommended doses for further study are oral panobinostat 30 mg three times per week, every other week, in combination with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every other week. A phase II clinical trial in recurrent HGG is underway.

Keywords

Panobinostat Bevacizumab High-grade glioma Vascular endothelial growth factor Histone deacetylase inhibitor 

Notes

Acknowledgments

E.Q. Lee has served on the advisory board of Novartis and Genentech/Roche. T. T. Batchelor has served on the advisory board for Genentech/Roche. R. Beroukhim has received research support from Novartis. S.M. Snodgrass is an employee of Novartis. J.J. Raizer has received research support from Novartis and Genentech/Roche, served on the advisory boards of both Novartis and Genentech/Roche and is on the speaker’s bureau of Genentech/Roche. P.Y. Wen has received research support from Novartis and Genentech/Roche and served on the advisory boards of both Novartis and Genentech/Roche.

Conflict of interest

All other authors report no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Drappatz
    • 1
  • E. Q. Lee
    • 1
  • S. Hammond
    • 1
  • S. A. Grimm
    • 2
  • A. D. Norden
    • 1
  • R. Beroukhim
    • 1
  • M. Gerard
    • 1
  • D. Schiff
    • 4
  • A. S. Chi
    • 3
  • T. T. Batchelor
    • 3
  • L. M. Doherty
    • 1
  • A. S. Ciampa
    • 1
  • D. C. LaFrankie
    • 1
  • S. Ruland
    • 1
  • S. M. Snodgrass
    • 5
  • J. J. Raizer
    • 2
  • P. Y. Wen
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Neuro-OncologyDana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  5. 5.Novartis PharmaceuticalsEast HanoverUSA

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