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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 104, Issue 1, pp 287–291 | Cite as

Retrospective study of dasatinib for recurrent glioblastoma after bevacizumab failure

  • C. Lu-Emerson
  • A. D. Norden
  • J. Drappatz
  • E. C. Quant
  • R. Beroukhim
  • A. S. Ciampa
  • L. M. Doherty
  • D. C. LaFrankie
  • S. Ruland
  • P. Y. WenEmail author
Clinical Study – Patient Study

Abstract

There is no effective treatment for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) after bevacizumab failure. Putative mechanisms of resistance to bevacizumab include increased pericyte coverage, mediated partly by platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling, and an infiltrative tumor growth pattern potentially dependent on SRC. We explored the efficacy of dasatinib, a SRC, BCR-ABL, c-KIT, EPHA2, and PDGFRβ inhibitor, in patients with recurrent GBM after bevacizumab failure. Adult patients with histologically confirmed GBM who failed bevacizumab therapy were treated with dasatinib 70–100 mg twice daily in combination with bevacizumab (n = 14), until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Fourteen patients were treated. Median age was 55 years (range 32–66) and median KPS was 80 (range 50–90). All patients (100%) had glioblastomas. The median number of prior regimens was 4 (range from 2 to 6). Of the thirteen evaluable patients, none had a complete or partial response. Only one patient had stable disease after an 8 week interval. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 28 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 26–35 days). Six month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 0%. Median overall survival (OS) was 78 days (95% CI 41–137 days). Treatment was moderately well-tolerated, although one patient sustained a grade 4 intracerebral hemorrhage. Dasatinib in conjunction with bevacizumab does not appear to have activity in patients with recurrent, heavily pretreated GBM.

Keywords

High grade glioma Glioblastoma Bevacizumab failure Dasatinib PDGFR beta inhibitor SRC inhibitor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Lu-Emerson
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. D. Norden
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Drappatz
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. C. Quant
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Beroukhim
    • 1
  • A. S. Ciampa
    • 1
  • L. M. Doherty
    • 1
  • D. C. LaFrankie
    • 1
  • S. Ruland
    • 1
  • P. Y. Wen
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Neuro-Oncology, Department of NeurologyBrigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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