New Forests

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 179–189 | Cite as

Importance of rubberwood in wood export of Malaysia and Thailand

  • Akira Shigematsu
  • Nobuya Mizoue
  • Tsuyoshi Kajisa
  • Shigejiro Yoshida
Article

Abstracts

We examined the contribution of rubberwood to the timber export markets of Malaysia and Thailand. In Malaysia, rubberwood has grown from 26% of total exported wood products in 1998 to 35% in 2007. A high proportion of furniture products (80%) is rubberwood, whereas the contribution of rubberwood to other wooden products is less than 20%. Only 10% of sawn timber and logs is rubberwood. In Thailand, rubberwood contributes to around 60% of total exported wood products, arising from a high share of not only furniture products (70%) but also other wood products (around 50%) and sawn timber and logs, which have increased in share from 40% in 1998 to 79% in 2007. We conclude that the high proportion of rubberwood products in the wood export markets of these two countries is a result of: (1) scarcity of raw wood materials because of strict controls on the logging of natural forests; and (2) governmental support to rubberwood production, including financial support to rubber planters and technical assistance to downstream timber processors.

Keywords

Forest plantation Rubberwood Governmental support Rubber plantation management 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was partially funded through a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (No. 18255009) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Shigematsu
    • 1
  • Nobuya Mizoue
    • 1
  • Tsuyoshi Kajisa
    • 1
  • Shigejiro Yoshida
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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