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New Forests

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 175–195 | Cite as

Diversity and genetic structure of teak (Tectona grandis L.f) in its natural range using DNA microsatellite markers

  • Inza Jesus Fofana
  • Daniel Ofori
  • Mireille Poitel
  • Daniel VerhaegenEmail author
Article

Abstract

Teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) is considered to be an extraordinarily durable building timber with a worldwide reputation. Its widespread use has entailed the over-exploitation of natural forests and a large reduction in natural diversity. Fifteen microsatellite markers were used to study the genetic variability and structure of 166 teak trees distributed over the whole natural area of teak. Analysis showed that in the teak natural area there were four main centers of genetic variability. Two clusters were in India and could be considered as main centers of genetic diversity in teak. The third cluster mainly consisting of populations in Thailand and Laos was genetically very distinct from the Indian populations but presented only half as much allelic variability. A fourth cluster from Central Laos showed even less genetic variability. The use of SSR markers for conservation of teak forest diversity is discussed.

Keywords

Genetic structure Genetic diversity SSR Tectona grandis Conservation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the European Commission project “Waft” (Inco-Dev ICA4-CT-2001-10090) which supported this research in Ghana, in Ivory Coast and in the CIRAD BIOS UR 39 laboratory. Many thanks to the Sodefor (Forest Development Society BP 3770 Abidjan 01 Côte d’Ivoire) and Forig (Forestry Research Institute of Ghana UST P.O Box 63 Kumasi Ghana) which supplied the teak plant material. Finally, we thank Claire Billot of CIRAD Bios for having allowed and facilitated access to the sequencer of the molecular biology laboratory, as well as Ronan Rivallan for technical support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inza Jesus Fofana
    • 1
  • Daniel Ofori
    • 2
  • Mireille Poitel
    • 3
  • Daniel Verhaegen
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratoire de génétiqueUniversité de Cocody, AbidjanAbidjanIvory Coast
  2. 2.CSIR- Forestry Research Institute of GhanaTree Improvement and seed Technology Division, USTKumasiGhana
  3. 3.CIRAD Biological System DepartmentResearch Unit 39: “Genetic Diversity and Breeding of Forest Tree Species”Montpellier Cedex 5France

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