Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 571–576 | Cite as

Efficacy and Tolerance of Glatiramer Acid (Copaxone) on Long-Term Use: 10 Years of Experience at the Moscow City Multiple Sclerosis Center

  • A. N. Boiko
  • M. V. Davydovskaya
  • T. L. Demina
  • N. Yu. Lashch
  • V. V. Ovcharov
  • E. V. Popova
  • N. F. Popova
  • A. V. Romashkin
  • O. V. Boiko
  • N. V. Khachanova
  • S. N. Sharanova
  • S. G. Shchur
  • E. I. Gusev
Article

We summarize here 10 years of experience of using glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) in 74 patients with active remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Significant decreases in the frequency of disease exacerbation over all 10 years were noted. Disease severity on the EDSS was stable and increased significantly only by the tenth year of observations. Positive stable clinical dynamics were independent of disease severity at the moment of treatment initiation. Tolerance of glatiramer acetate was good, allowing us to come close to controlling the course of MS – 64.8% of patients had no more than one exacerbation in 10 years, while 71.6% showed no or minimal progression of disease (up to 1 point on the EDSS scale). These observations lead to the conclusion that 10 years of treatment with Copaxone allows disease development to be controlled in many patients.

Keywords

multiple sclerosis treatment glatiramer acetate prolonged observations 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. N. Boiko
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. V. Davydovskaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. L. Demina
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. Yu. Lashch
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. V. Ovcharov
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. V. Popova
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. F. Popova
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. V. Romashkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. V. Boiko
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. V. Khachanova
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. N. Sharanova
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. G. Shchur
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. I. Gusev
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and NeurosurgeryN. M. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical UniversityMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Moscow City Multiple Sclerosis CenterMoscowRussia

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