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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 41, Issue 5, pp 495–499 | Cite as

Use of Terahertz Irradiation at the Frequencies of Nitric Oxide for Correction of the Antioxidant Properties of the Blood and Lipid Peroxidation in Stress

  • V. F. Kirichuk
  • A. A. Tsymbal
Article
  • 49 Downloads

The effects of terahertz irradiation at the frequencies of the molecular spectrum of nitric oxide emission and absorption on the intensity of lipid peroxidation processes and the antioxidant properties of the blood were studied in white rats in conditions of immobilization stress. Terahertz irradiation at 150.176–150.664 GHz was found to produce complete normalization of lipid peroxidation processes and the functional activity of antioxidants on the background of stress in white rats.

Key words

lipid peroxidation antioxidants terahertz irradiation nitric oxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Normal PhysiologyState Medical UniversitySaratovRussia

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