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3D Structural, Facies and Petrophysical Modeling of C Member of Six Hills Formation, Komombo Basin, Upper Egypt

  • Moamen AliEmail author
  • Ahmed Abdelmaksoud
  • M. A. Essa
  • A. Abdelhady
  • M. Darwish
Original Paper
  • 109 Downloads

Abstract

Two main reservoirs are producing in Komombo Basin: the first one belongs to the C Member of the Six Hills Formation, and the second belongs to the Albian/Cenomanian cycle. The C Member reservoir lacks detailed studies. Therefore, a detailed study of this reservoir is needed. 3D geological reservoir modeling of the C Member reservoir can be a pertinent part of an overall strategy for the development of hydrocarbon fields in Komombo Basin. Five boreholes, three vertical seismic profiles and twenty 2D seismic reflection sections are integrated in Petrel™ modeling software for building 3D structural, facies and petrophysical models for the C Member reservoir. The constructed 3D structural model reveals the presence of two normal faults, in NW–SE and NE–SW directions. A detailed petrophysical evaluation was performed for the available wells. The resulted facies/petrophysical parameters are then used as input in the processes of facies and petrophysical modeling. The C Member reservoir exhibits thickness values ranging from about 91.5 to 426.5 m. The constructed 3D facies model of the studied reservoir depicts that the shale beds have the large probability distribution in the study area with the comparison of the sandstone and siltstone beds. The created 3D petrophysical models reveal that the C Member reservoir has a fair reservoir quality. This reservoir exhibits, generally, high water saturation values in most parts of the study area, while the hydrocarbon saturation is restricted to the depocenter of the basin.

Keywords

Komombo Basin C Member Six Hills Formation Reservoir characterization 3D geological model Upper Egypt 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge GANOPE Company for providing the seismic and well data and for giving the approval to publish this manuscript. The authors are grateful to Eng. Ahmed Samy (geophysicist at GANOPE) for fruitful discussion that led to a better understanding of many points. Thanks are also due to the reviewers for their valuable comments and constructive modifications that greatly enhanced the manuscript. In addition, the authors would like to thank the Editor-in-Chief Prof. Dr. John Carranza for his effort in editing the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© International Association for Mathematical Geosciences 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geology, Faculty of ScienceAssiut UniversityAssiutEgypt
  2. 2.DEA GroupCairoEgypt
  3. 3.Department of Geology, Faculty of ScienceCairo UniversityGizaEgypt

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