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Surface modification strategy based on the conjugation of NaYF4:5%Eu luminescent nanoprobe with organic aromatic compounds for application in bioimaging assays

  • Rodrigo da Silva Viana
  • Luciana Amaral de Mascena Costa
  • Andressa N. R. Leal
  • Tyrslai M. Williams
  • Liquian Luan
  • Guanyu Zhang
  • Maodie Wang
  • Ashlyn C. Harmon
  • Janaina V. dos Anjos
  • Rafael Cueto
  • Manoel Adrião Gomes Filho
  • Eduardo H. L. Falcão
  • Maria G. H. Vicente
  • Severino A. JuniorEmail author
  • J. Michael MathisEmail author
Research Paper
  • 47 Downloads

Abstract

Colon cancer is one of the world’s most deadly diseases. Because of its internal location, it is necessary to obtain faster and more efficient diagnostic tools for this organ site. In this context, we studied the development of new luminescent nanoprobes (LNPs) as an alternative diagnostic apparatus for detecting this disease. The nanoparticles examined herein are lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4:Ln) and have shown to be promising as investigative devices. However, significant problems with the use of LNPs are the lack of biocompatibility and the targeting of the system to tumor regions. One of the strategies to bypass these problems is to increase of the particle lipophilicity modifying their surfaces with organic compounds that present high similarity to the biological system. In this work, we synthesized six new materials for use in bioimaging techniques obtained from the combination of nanoparticles of NaYF4:5%Eu with organic aromatic compounds covalently bonded. The materials were characterized structurally and morphologically using XRD and TEM, techniques, which showed the identification of the crystallographic phase β-NaYF4:5%Eu and its nanometric size (particles smaller than 50 nm). The conjugation process was confirmed by FT-IR spectra analysis and from the TGA profile. Excitation and emission spectra allowed the evaluation of the optical properties of the synthesized compounds. The interaction and cellular uptake was confirmed when HT-29 colon cancer cells were exposed to LNPs, indicating that the developed system has promising applications in bioimaging procedures.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Luminescent nanoprobe Surface conjugation Couple reaction Cell imaging NaYF4:5%Eu Diagnostic tool 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the staff in the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, and the Shared Instrument Facility at Louisiana State University (USA), and the Fundamental Chemistry Department at the Federal University of Pernambuco (Brazil) for their technical support. We gratefully acknowledge the CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico), FACEPE (Fundação de Amparo à Ciência e Tecnologia do Estado de Pernambuco), CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), and the NSF (National Science Foundation) for funding in support of this work.

Funding

This work was jointly supported by Brazil grants from the FACEPE (grant nos. APQ-0742-1.06/15, APQ-0675-1.06/14, APQ-0549-1.06/17) and from the CNPq (grant no. 428020/2016-0). We also acknowledge the FACEPE for a Brazilian scholarship (grant no. IBPG-1414-3.03/14) and CAPES for an international scholarship through the Science without Borders program (88887.122971/2016-00). USA funding was supported through the NSF (grant no. 1800126) and provided by the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine. These funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation and submission of the manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

11051_2018_4422_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3.6 mb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 3.60 mb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rodrigo da Silva Viana
    • 1
  • Luciana Amaral de Mascena Costa
    • 2
  • Andressa N. R. Leal
    • 1
  • Tyrslai M. Williams
    • 3
  • Liquian Luan
    • 3
  • Guanyu Zhang
    • 3
  • Maodie Wang
    • 3
  • Ashlyn C. Harmon
    • 4
  • Janaina V. dos Anjos
    • 1
  • Rafael Cueto
    • 3
  • Manoel Adrião Gomes Filho
    • 2
  • Eduardo H. L. Falcão
    • 1
  • Maria G. H. Vicente
    • 3
  • Severino A. Junior
    • 1
    Email author
  • J. Michael Mathis
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Fundamental ChemistryFederal University of PernambucoRecifeBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Animal Morphology and PhysiologyFederal Rural University of PernambucoRecifeBrazil
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary MedicineLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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