Advertisement

Development and evaluation of triclosan loaded poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticulate system for the treatment of periodontal infections

  • Nafiu Aminu
  • Sanjula Baboota
  • K. Pramod
  • Manisha Singh
  • Shweta Dang
  • Shahid H. Ansari
  • Jasjeet K. Sahni
  • Javed AliEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

Periodontal disease affects tooth-supporting structures and nanoparticles (NPs) have been a promising approach for its treatment. The purpose of the study was to develop triclosan-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) NPs for the treatment of periodontal infections. Solvent displacement method was used to prepare NPs following Box–Behnken design. The NPs were evaluated with respect to particle size, polydispersity index, surface morphology, zeta potential, thermal properties, in vitro drug release, and cell viability assay. The optimized NPs were in the size range of 180–230 nm with a mean size of 205.61 ± 10.4 nm. Entrapment efficiency (EE) of 91.02 ± 2.4 % was obtained with a drug loading of 21.71 ± 1.3 %. About 97 % of drug was released in vitro after 3 h. NPs demonstrated almost 100 % cell viability in L929 cell lines. Shelf life of the nanoparticles was 17.07 months. PCL affected particle size whereas triclosan affected loading and EE. The optimized NPs were spherical with smooth surface and exhibited biphasic in vitro release pattern. NPs had optimum zeta potential and PDI and were stable on storage. Absence of cytotoxicity of NPs to L929 cells indicated its safety. Triclosan-loaded PCL nanoparticles could thus serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system against periodontal infections.

Keywords

Targeted drug delivery system Colloids Nanoparticles Periodontal disease Box–Behnken design Nanomedicine Cell viability assay 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors would like to thank the staff of Electron Microscopy Dept., AIIMS for conducting SEM and TEM analysis. Mr. Nafiu Aminu (M. Pharm.) thanks Zamfara state government of Nigeria for its inestimable and incessant support to him in this project.

References

  1. Bollen CM, Quirynen M (1996) Microbiological response to mechanical treatment in combination with adjunctive therapy. A review of the literature. J Periodontol 67:1143–1158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Chawla JS, Amiji MM (2002) Biodegradable poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles for tumor-targeted delivery of tamoxifen. Int J Pharm 249:127–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chiappetta DA, Degrossi J, Teves S, D’Aquino M, Bregni C, Sosnik A (2008) Triclosan-loaded poloxamine micelles for enhanced topical antibacterial activity against biofilm. Eur J Pharm Biopharm 69:535–545CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Espuelas MS, Legrand P, Irache JM, Gamazo C, Orecchioni AM, Devissaguet JP, Ygartua P (1997) Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanospheres as an alternative way to reduce amphotericin-B toxicity. Int J Pharm 158:19–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Huang X, Brazel CS (2001) On the importance and mechanisms of burst release in matrix-controlled drug delivery systems. J Control Release 73:121–136CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. International Conference on Harmonisation (2003) ICH Harmonised Tripartite Guideline: Stability testing of new drug substances and products, Q1A(R2). International Conference on Harmonisation, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  7. Jain N, Jain GK, Javed S, Iqbal Z, Talegaonkar S, Ahmad FJ, Khar RK (2008) Recent approaches for the treatment of periodontitis. Drug Discov Today 13:932–943CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kim JC, Lee HY, Kim MH, Lee HJ, Kang HY, Kim SM (2006) Preparation and characterization of chitosan/gelatin microcapsules containing triclosan. Colloids Surf B 52:52–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Koleske JV (1978) Blends containing poly(ε-caprolactone) and related polymers. In: Paul DR, Newman S (eds) Polymer blends, vol 2. Academic Press, New York, pp 369–389Google Scholar
  10. Medlicott NJ, Rathbone MJ, Tucker IG, Holborow DW (1994) Delivery systems for the administration of drugs to the periodontal pocket. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 13:181–203CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Mu L, Feng SS (2002) Vitamin E TPGS used as emulsifier in the solvent evaporation/extraction technique for fabrication of polymeric nanospheres for controlled release of paclitaxel (Taxol®). J Control Release 80:129–144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Murthy RSR (1997) Biodegradable polymers. In: Jain NK (ed) Controlled and novel drug delivery. CBS Publisher, New Delhi, pp 27–51Google Scholar
  13. Ozmeric N (2004) Advances in periodontal disease markers. Clin Chim Acta 343:1–16CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Pihlstrom BL, Michalowicz BS, Johnson NW (2005) Periodontal diseases. Lancet 366:1809–1820CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Piñón-Segundo E, Ganem-Quintanar A, Alonso-Pérez V, Quintanar-Guerrero D (2005) Preparation and characterization of triclosan nanoparticles for periodontal treatment. Int J Pharm 294:217–232CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Quintanar-Guerrero D, Allemann E, Fessi H, Doelker E (1998) Preparation techniques and mechanisms of formation of biodegradable nanoparticles from preformed polymers. Drug Dev Ind Pharm 24:1113–1127CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Rosling B, Dahlen G, Volpe AR, Furuichi Y, Ramberg P, Lindhe J (1997) Effect of triclosan on the subgingival microbiota of periodontitis-susceptible subjects. J Clin Periodontol 24:881–887CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Schroeder HE (1976) Pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal disease: a summary of current work. Lab Invest 34:235–249Google Scholar
  19. Schwach-Abdellaoui K, Vivien-Castioni N, Gurny R (2000) Local delivery of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Eur J Pharm Biopharm 50:83–99CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Shaikh J, Ankola DD, Beniwal V, Singh D, Ravi-Kumar MNV (2009) Nanoparticle encapsulation improves oral bioavailability of curcumin by at least ninefold when compared to curcumin administered with piperine as absorption enhancer. Eur J Pharm Sci 37:223–230CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sinha VR, Bansal K, Kaushik R, Kumria R, Trehan A (2004) Poly-ε-caprolactone microspheres and nanospheres: an overview. Int J Pharm 278:1–23CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Slots J, Rams TE (1990) Antibiotics in periodontal therapy: advantages and disadvantages. J Clin Periodontol 17:479–493CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Southard GL, Godowski KC (1998) Subgingival controlled release of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of periodontal disease. Int J Antimicrob Agents 9:239–253CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Zili Z, Sfar S, Fessi H (2005) Preparation and characterization of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles containing griseofulvin. Int J Pharm 29:261–267CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nafiu Aminu
    • 1
  • Sanjula Baboota
    • 1
  • K. Pramod
    • 1
  • Manisha Singh
    • 2
  • Shweta Dang
    • 2
  • Shahid H. Ansari
    • 3
  • Jasjeet K. Sahni
    • 1
  • Javed Ali
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of PharmacyJamia HamdardNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Department of BiotechnologyJaypee Institute of Information TechnologyNoidaIndia
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacognosy & Phytochemistry, Faculty of PharmacyJamia HamdardNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations