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A Promising Combo Gene Delivery System Developed from (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-Modified Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Cationic Polymers

  • Zubin Zhang
  • Lina Song
  • Jinlai Dong
  • Dawei Guo
  • Xiaolin Du
  • Biyin Cao
  • Yu Zhang
  • Ning Gu
  • Xinliang MaoEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

(3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (APTES-IONPs) have been evaluated for various biomedical applications, including medical imaging and drug delivery. Cationic polymers (CPs) such as Lipofectamine and TurboFect are widely used for research in gene delivery, but their toxicity and low in vivo efficiency limited their further application. In the present study, we synthesized water-soluble APTES-IONPs and developed a combo gene delivery system based on APTES-IONPs and CPs. This system significantly increased gene-binding capacity, protected genes from degradation, and improved gene transfection efficiency for DNA and siRNA in both adherent and suspension cells. Because of its great biocompatibility, high gene-carrying ability, and very low cytotoxicity, this combo gene delivery system will be expected for a wide application, and it might provide a new method for gene therapy.

Keywords

Iron oxide nanoparticles (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTES) Cationic polymers Leukemia Gene delivery 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Program “973”, 2011CB933501), by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 81071935, 81272632, 81101795), by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (Grants No. BK2010218, BK2011268), and by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zubin Zhang
    • 1
  • Lina Song
    • 2
  • Jinlai Dong
    • 2
  • Dawei Guo
    • 2
  • Xiaolin Du
    • 1
  • Biyin Cao
    • 1
  • Yu Zhang
    • 2
  • Ning Gu
    • 2
  • Xinliang Mao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Cyrus Tang Hematology CenterSoochow UniversitySuzhouChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and DevicesSchool of Biological Science & Medical Engineering, Southeast UniversityNanjingChina

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