Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 1–13 | Cite as

Societal implications of nanoscience and nanotechnology: Maximizing human benefit

Article

Abstract

The balance between the potential benefits and risks of nanotechnology is discussed based on judgments expressed by leading industry, academe and government experts at a U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) sponsored meeting. The results are summarized in various themes related to: economic impacts and commercialization; social scenarios; technological convergence; quality of life; ethics and law; governance, public perceptions, and education.

Keywords

nanoscale science and engineering nanotechnology benefits and uncertainties responsible R&D recommendations converging technologies 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Science FoundationArlingtonUSA

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