Mycopathologia

, Volume 165, Issue 6, pp 407–410 | Cite as

A Case of Cunninghamella bertholettiae Rhino-cerebral Infection in a Leukaemic Patient and Review of Recent Published Studies

  • E. Righi
  • C. G. Giacomazzi
  • V. Lindstrom
  • A. Albarello
  • O. Soro
  • M. Miglino
  • M. Perotti
  • O. E. Varnier
  • M. Gobbi
  • C. Viscoli
  • M. Bassetti
Article

Abstract

Cunninghamella bertholletiae infection occurs most frequently in neutropenic patients affected by haematological malignancies, is associated with an unfavourable outcome. We report a case of rhino-mastoidal fungal infection in a leukaemic patient. Bioptical tissue cultures yield the isolation of a mould with typical properties of Cunninghamella species. Liposomal amphotericin B (L-Amb) therapy combined with surgical intervention brought the lesion to recovery. Nevertheless, the patient died 14 days after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from bacterial sepsis. Mastoiditis was documented at CT-scan. The conditioning regimen probably caused the reactivation of the Cunninghamella infection that led to the patient’s fatal outcome; fungal hyphae were detected after autopsy of brain and lung tissue.

Keywords

L-amphotericin B Cunninghamella bertholettiae Rhino-cerebral Leukaemia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Righi
    • 1
  • C. G. Giacomazzi
    • 2
  • V. Lindstrom
    • 1
  • A. Albarello
    • 3
  • O. Soro
    • 2
  • M. Miglino
    • 3
  • M. Perotti
    • 2
  • O. E. Varnier
    • 2
  • M. Gobbi
    • 3
  • C. Viscoli
    • 1
  • M. Bassetti
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, S. Martino HospitalUniversity of Genoa School of MedicineGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Section of Microbiology, S. Martino HospitalUniversity of Genoa School of MedicineGenoaItaly
  3. 3.Division of Haematology, S. Martino HospitalUniversity of Genoa School of MedicineGenoaItaly

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