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Social Innovations in Smart Cities – Case of Poprad

  • Milan HusarEmail author
  • Vladimir Ondrejicka
Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

The following paper is discussing the concept of smart cities in the nexus with social innovations. The objective of these two concepts should be increased quality of life in the urban areas. Paper critically examines smart cities and focuses on their use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) as tools for reaching the objective of better and sustainable cities. Case study method is utilized in order to examine how the environment for social innovations can be fostered and how ICT can be used to achieve change in citizens behavior and improve the quality of life in the city of Poprad in Slovakia.

Keywords

Smart cities Social innovation Poprad ICT 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This contribution is the result of the project implementation: SPECTRA+ No. 26240120002 “Centre of Excellence for the Development of Settlement Infrastructure of Knowledge Economy” supported by the Research & Development Operational Programme funded by the ERDF. The key finding will be used in outputs (assessment of HBA governance system at national level, local strategy for Poprad HBA) developed under the INTERREG project Bhenefit CE 1202 “Build heritage, energy and environmental-friendly integrated tools for the sustainable management of historic urban areas” and national grant scheme Vega 2/0013/17.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Spectra Centre of ExcellenceSlovak University of Technology in BratislavaBratislavaSlovakia

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