Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 39, Issue 10, pp 9521–9527

Characterization of a novel ERF transcription factor in Artemisia annua and its induction kinetics after hormones and stress treatments

  • Xu Lu
  • Weimin Jiang
  • Ling Zhang
  • Fangyuan Zhang
  • Qian Shen
  • Tao Wang
  • Yunfei Chen
  • Shaoyan Wu
  • Zongyou Lv
  • Erdi Gao
  • Bo Qiu
  • Kexuan Tang
Article

Abstract

The full-length cDNA sequence of AaERF3 was cloned and characterized from Artemisia annua. The bioinformatic analysis and phylogenetic tree analysis implied that the AaERF3 encoded a putative protein of 193 amino acids which formed a closely related subgroup with AtERF1, ERF1 and ORA59 in Arabidopsis. The result of subcellular localization showed that AaERF3 targeted to both of the nuclei and the cytoplasm. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that Green young alabastrums had the highest expression level of AaERF3 in the 5-months-old plants. The qRT-PCR analysis also revealed that ABA, Wound and Cold treatments significantly enhanced the transcript expression of AaERF3. MeJA and Ethylene treatment could also slightly induce the accumulation of AaERF3 transcription.

Keywords

Ethylene response factor Induction kinetics Subcelluar localization 

Supplementary material

11033_2012_1816_MOESM1_ESM.tif (2 mb)
Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of AP2/ERF-related proteins that have high sequence similarity with AaERF3. Highly conserved residues in all the sequences are indicated in white with black background and only partially conserved residues in the ERF sequences are showed in black with grey background. The putative nuclear localization signals were indicated with ♦. Three β-sheets and alpha-helix are marked above the corresponding sequences. The YRG and RAYD elements are indicated with solid lines below the consensus sequence. (TIFF 2035 kb)
11033_2012_1816_MOESM2_ESM.tif (20 kb)
Phylogenic comparison of the AaERF3 protein and some AP2/ERF-related proteins sequences, based on the selected AP2/ERF domain amino acid sequences of those proteins. Alignments were made in Clustal X using the default parameters. Accession numbers for the AP2/ERF proteins used are as follows: AtERF1, AF076277; AtERF2, NM124093; AtERF3, XP002894264; AtERF4, NM112384; AtERF5, NM124094; AtERF6, Q8VZ91; AtERF7, NM112922; AtERF8, Q9MAI5; AtERF9, Q9FE67; AtERF10, Q9ZWA2; AtERF11, Q9C5I3; AtERF12, Q94ID6; ERF1, AAD03545; ORA59, NM100497; LeERF1, Q84XB3; TaERF3, EF570122; NtERF1, Q40476; NsERF2, Q9LW50. (TIFF 19 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xu Lu
    • 1
  • Weimin Jiang
    • 1
  • Ling Zhang
    • 1
  • Fangyuan Zhang
    • 1
  • Qian Shen
    • 1
  • Tao Wang
    • 1
  • Yunfei Chen
    • 1
  • Shaoyan Wu
    • 1
  • Zongyou Lv
    • 1
  • Erdi Gao
    • 1
  • Bo Qiu
    • 1
  • Kexuan Tang
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Biotechnology Research Center, SJTU–Cornell Institute of Sustainable Agriculture and Biotechnology, Fudan-SJTU-Nottingham Plant Biotechnology R&D CenterSchool of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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