Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 38, Issue 7, pp 4257–4264

Analysis of variable sites between two complete South China tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis) mitochondrial genomes

  • Wenping Zhang
  • Bisong Yue
  • Xiaofang Wang
  • Xiuyue Zhang
  • Zhong Xie
  • Nonglin Liu
  • Wenyuan Fu
  • Yaohua Yuan
  • Daqing Chen
  • Danghua Fu
  • Bo Zhao
  • Yuzhong Yin
  • Xiahui Yan
  • Xinjing Wang
  • Rongying Zhang
  • Jie Liu
  • Maoping Li
  • Yao Tang
  • Rong Hou
  • Zhihe Zhang
Article

Abstract

In order to investigate the mitochondrial genome of Panthera tigris amoyensis, two South China tigers (P25 and P27) were analyzed following 15 cymt-specific primer sets. The entire mtDNA sequence was found to be 16,957 bp and 17,001 bp long for P25 and P27 respectively, and this difference in length between P25 and P27 occurred in the number of tandem repeats in the RS-3 segment of the control region. The structural characteristics of complete P. t. amoyensis mitochondrial genomes were also highly similar to those of P. uncia. Additionally, the rate of point mutation was only 0.3% and a total of 59 variable sites between P25 and P27 were found. Out of the 59 variable sites, 6 were located in 6 different tRNA genes, 6 in the 2 rRNA genes, 7 in non-coding regions (one located between tRNA-Asn and tRNA-Tyr and six in the D-loop), and 40 in 10 protein-coding genes. COI held the largest amount of variable sites (9 sites) and Cytb contained the highest variable rate (0.7%) in the complete sequences. Moreover, out of the 40 variable sites located in 10 protein-coding genes, 12 sites were nonsynonymous.

Keywords

Complete mitochondrial genome Panthera tigris amoyensis Variable site 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenping Zhang
    • 1
  • Bisong Yue
    • 2
  • Xiaofang Wang
    • 2
  • Xiuyue Zhang
    • 2
  • Zhong Xie
    • 3
  • Nonglin Liu
    • 3
  • Wenyuan Fu
    • 4
  • Yaohua Yuan
    • 5
  • Daqing Chen
    • 6
  • Danghua Fu
    • 7
  • Bo Zhao
    • 8
  • Yuzhong Yin
    • 9
  • Xiahui Yan
    • 10
  • Xinjing Wang
    • 11
  • Rongying Zhang
    • 12
  • Jie Liu
    • 13
  • Maoping Li
    • 14
  • Yao Tang
    • 15
  • Rong Hou
    • 1
  • Zhihe Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.The Sichuan Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology on Endangered WildlifeChengdu Research Base of Giant Panda BreedingChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.The Sichuan Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology on Endangered WildlifeSichuan UniversityChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Chinese Association of Zoological GardensBeijingChina
  4. 4.Fujian Meihuashan Institute of South China Tiger BreedingShanghangChina
  5. 5.Shanghai ZooShanghaiChina
  6. 6.Suzhou ZooSuzhouChina
  7. 7.Nanchang ZooNanchangChina
  8. 8.Chengdu ZooChengduChina
  9. 9.Chongqing ZooChongqingChina
  10. 10.Changsha ZooChangshaChina
  11. 11.Guangzhou ZooGuangzhouChina
  12. 12.Shenzhen Wild ZooShenzhenChina
  13. 13.Guiyang Wild ZooGuiyangChina
  14. 14.Luoyang Wangcheng GardenLuoyangChina
  15. 15.Fuzhou ZooFuzhouChina

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