Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 3601–3608

Linking the septin expression with carcinogenesis

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11033-010-0009-2

Cite this article as:
Liu, M., Shen, S., Chen, F. et al. Mol Biol Rep (2010) 37: 3601. doi:10.1007/s11033-010-0009-2

Abstract

The septin is a conserved GTP binding protein family which is involved in multiple cellular processes. Many evidences have indicated that some septins were abnormally expressed in certain kinds of tumors and the altered expressions were related to the process of carcinogenesis. To better understand the relationship between septins and cancer, we compared the expression of 14 human septin family members in 35 kinds of tumor types with their normal counterparts using the publicly available ONCOMINE microarray database. We found altered expression of most septin members in many kinds of tumors. Significantly, SEPT2, SEPT8, SEPT9, SEPT11 were consistently up-regulated, and SEPT4, SEPT10 were down-regulated in most cancer types investigated. Furthermore, the abnormal expressions were also in accordance with the tumor malignances or prognosis of corresponding cancer patients. These findings have contributed to the view that septins may belong to a kind of cancer critical genes. More septins might act as potential oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in cancer development.

Keywords

Septin Carcinogenesis Expression ONCOMINE 

Supplementary material

11033_2010_9_MOESM1_ESM.tif (543 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (TIFF 542 kb) Supplementary Fig. S1 Over-expression of SEPT2 in 11 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–11 represent the over-expression of SEPT2 in brain tumors, breast cancer, cervix cancer, gastric cancer, head and neck cancer, liver cancer, melanoma, mesothelioma, myeloma, pancreas cancer, and salivary gland cancer respectively
11033_2010_9_MOESM2_ESM.tif (517 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (TIFF 517 kb) Supplementary Fig. S2 Over-expression of SEPT8 in 12 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–12 represent the over-expression of SEPT8 in adrenal cancer, bladder cancer, leukemia, liver cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma, mesothelioma, myeloma, pancreas cancer, renal cancer, salivary gland cancer and seminoma
11033_2010_9_MOESM3_ESM.tif (574 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (TIFF 573 kb) Supplementary Fig. S3 Over-expression of SEPT9 in 15 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–15 represent the over-expression of SEPT9 in brain tumors, breast cancer, esophagus cancer, head and neck cancer, leukemia, liver cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, mesothelioma, myeloma, pancreas cancer, renal cancer, salivary gland cancer and seminoma
11033_2010_9_MOESM4_ESM.tif (728 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (TIFF 727 kb) Supplementary Fig. S4 Over-expression of SEPT11 in 12 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–12 represent the over-expression of SEPT11 in brain tumors, breast cancer, cervix cancer, esophagus cancer, head and neck cancer, leukemia, melanoma, ovarian cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, renal cancer and seminoma
11033_2010_9_MOESM5_ESM.tif (516 kb)
Supplementary material 5 (TIFF 516 kb) Supplementary Fig. S5 Down-regulation of SEPT4 in 11 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–11 represent the down-regulation of SEPT11 in adrenal cancer, bladder cancer, brain tumors, breast cancer, cervix cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, ovarian cance, pancreas cancer and seminoma
11033_2010_9_MOESM6_ESM.tif (554 kb)
Supplementary material 6 (TIFF 553 kb) Supplementary Fig. S6 Down-regulation of SEPT10 in 11 cancer types compared to their normal counterparts. Column 1–11 represent the down-regulation of SEPT11 in bladder cancer, breast cancer, head and neck carcinoma, liver cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, ovarian, pancreas, prostate, seminoma and testis tumor

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ming Liu
    • 1
  • Suqin Shen
    • 1
  • Fang Chen
    • 1
  • Wenbo Yu
    • 1
  • Long Yu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life SciencesFudan UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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