Molecular Biology Reports

, 36:2259

Associations of polymorphism within the GHSR gene with growth traits in Nanyang cattle

  • Bao Zhang
  • Hong Chen
  • Yikun Guo
  • Liangzhi Zhang
  • Miao Zhao
  • Xianyong Lan
  • Chunlei Zhang
  • Chuanying Pan
  • Shenrong Hu
  • Juqiang Wang
  • Chuzhao Lei
Article

Abstract

GH secretagogue receptor (ghrelin receptor, GHSR) is known to be involved in the control of GH release by mediating the strong stimulatory effect of the endogenous ligand, ghrelin, on GH secretion. Associations between the GHSR gene polymorphism and the growth traits were revealed in Nanyang cattle. The mutations at nt456(G > A) and nt667(C > T) were complete linkage and located in exon 1 of the coding region of the GHSR gene. Least squares analysis revealed a significant statistical effect (P < 0.05) of the GHSR gene different genotypes on body weight and average daily gain at 6 months of age in Nanyang cattle. Individuals with GHSR-MM genotype showed higher body weight and average daily gain than individuals with GHSR-MN genotype.

Keywords

Cattle GHSR gene Polymorphism SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) Growth traits 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bao Zhang
    • 1
  • Hong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yikun Guo
    • 1
  • Liangzhi Zhang
    • 1
  • Miao Zhao
    • 1
  • Xianyong Lan
    • 1
  • Chunlei Zhang
    • 2
  • Chuanying Pan
    • 1
  • Shenrong Hu
    • 1
  • Juqiang Wang
    • 3
  • Chuzhao Lei
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Animal Science and Technology, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for AgricultureNorthwest A&F UniversityYanglingChina
  2. 2.Institute of Cellular and Molecular BiologyXuzhou Normal UniversityXuzhouChina
  3. 3.Research Center of Cattle Engineering Technology in HenanZhengzhouPeoples Republic of China

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